When I look ahead innocently in a book and accidentally see a potential spoiler

macteenbooks:

sagspanther:

I’m like:

image

I just wanted to know when the chapter would end! Or how long it was! Noooooooo

this is the worst!!

(via she-was-too-fond-of-books)

thecardiganlibrarian:

jessylikesthings:

I made a thing today. #teenlibrarians #librarydisplay

Ooh, I like it!

thecardiganlibrarian:

jessylikesthings:

I made a thing today. #teenlibrarians #librarydisplay

Ooh, I like it!

(via womanking91)

brightblueinky:

coldalbion:

yukonstar:

anachronistichybrid:

[source]

Guh, flawless. Non-Westernised interpretations of the steampunk genre FTW. 

Wow

I’ve been REALLY wanting to see an Indian take on Steampunk so I am so pleased you have no idea

brightblueinky:

coldalbion:

yukonstar:

anachronistichybrid:

[source]

Guh, flawless. Non-Westernised interpretations of the steampunk genre FTW. 

Wow

I’ve been REALLY wanting to see an Indian take on Steampunk so I am so pleased you have no idea

(via themarysue)

"

It’s a fact that ableism, homophobia, and racism influence countless aspects of people’s everyday lives. Micro-aggressions, stereotypes, internalized prejudice, flagrant bigotry, institutionalised discrimination… There are also other matters to consider: accessibility, hair or skin care, limited dating pools, communities, culture, etc.

When none of these elements are acknowledged in realistic fiction, I notice. When the absence of those elements is praised, I notice especially.

And I wonder — perhaps uncharitably — are diverse characters only OK as long as they’re not too diverse?

"

Great article by YA author Corinne Duyvis on “incidental diversity” in books and the decline of the issues book. Lots worth thinking about.  (via leeandlow)

gaminginyourunderwear:

yaoiornah:

itsgeekyinhere:

Doing the do with you know who

The greatest mystery of all time solved…What Neville forget to remember in that scene.

All of this is important.

(via gaffertapeandhope)

Donations

Donations of books are wonderful. Except when it’s a set of thirty-year-old encyclopedias that smell like they were stored in a damp garage.

thecurvygeek:

Today is spirit day! show your support for LGBTQ youth by going purple today! 8 in 10 LGBTQ teens have reported being bullied for their orientation…and that’s just wrong! Every one deserves to feel safe and feel they can be themselves 

thecurvygeek:

Today is spirit day! show your support for LGBTQ youth by going purple today! 8 in 10 LGBTQ teens have reported being bullied for their orientation…and that’s just wrong! Every one deserves to feel safe and feel they can be themselves 

IT’S HERE! See Katniss return to District 12 in a brand new preview of Mockingjay Part 1.

(Source: mockingjaysource, via youngadultread)

diversityinya:

tubooks:

Thirteen Scary YA Books (diverse edition)

Halloween is right around the corner. There’s no better way to celebrate than by reading books that will scare you to pieces! Here’s a lucky thirteen list of our favorites (all featuring diverse characters or by diverse authors):

  1. Half WorldHalf World by Hiromi Goto – Melanie Tamaki lives with her mother in abject poverty. Then, her mother disappears. Melanie must journey to the mysterious Half World to save her.
  2. Vodnik by Bryce Moore – Sixteen-year-old Tomas moves back to Slovakia with his family and discovers the folktales of his childhood were more than just stories.
  3. The Immortal Rules by Julie Kagawa – Allie Sekemoto survives by scavenging for food by day. She hates the vampires who keep humans like cattle for their food. Until the day she dies and wakes up as a vampire.
  4. Liar by Justine Larbalestier – Micah is a liar; it’s the only thing she’ll tell you the truth about. But when her boyfriend Zach is murdered, the whole truth has to come out.
  5. Battle Royale by Koushan Takami – A group of junior high school students are sent to an island and forced to fight to the death until only one of them survives.
  6. Summer of the Mariposas by Guadalupe Garcia McCall – Odilia and her sisters discover aWolf Mark coverdead man’s body while swimming in the Rio Grande. They journey across Mexico to return his body in this Odyssey-inspired tale.
  7. Devil’s Kiss by Sarwat Chadda – Zombies, ghouls, and vampires all make appearances in the story of Bilquis SanGreal, the youngest and only female member of the Knights Templar.
  8. Panic by Sharon Draper – Diamond knows better than to get into a car with a stranger. But when the stranger offers her the chance to dance in a movie, Diamond makes a very wrong decision.
  9. Ten by Gretchen McNeil – Ten teens head to a secluded island for an exclusive party…until people start to die. A modern YA retelling of Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None.
  10. Wolf Mark by Joseph Bruchac – Inspired by the Abenaki skinwalker legend, this YA thriller is Burn Notice with werewolves.
  11. The Girl From The WellThe Girl from the Well by Rin Chupeco – A dead girl roams the streets, hunting murders. A strange tattooed boy moves to the neighborhood with a deadly secret.
  12. 172 Hours on the Moon by Johan Harstad –  Three teenagers win the vacation of a lifetime: a week-long trip to the moon. But something sinister is waiting for them in the black vacuum of space.
  13. Anna Dressed in Blood by Kendare Blake – Cas Lowood is a ghost hunter, called to Thunder Bay, Ontario to get rid of a ghost the locals call Anna Dressed in Blood, who has killed every person who has stepped foot in the house she haunts.

What else would you add to the list?

Just in time for Halloween!

(via weneeddiversebooks)

macteenbooks:

Congrats to our author Steve Sheinkin!
teachingliteracy:

nprbooks:
You guys!  We are so VERY excited to be the ones to announce this year’s National Book Award finalists! Check out the full list here.

macteenbooks:

Congrats to our author Steve Sheinkin!

teachingliteracy:

nprbooks:

You guys!  We are so VERY excited to be the ones to announce this year’s National Book Award finalists! Check out the full list here.